Hide And Seek

I’m really good at hide-and-seek. You know the game. No, not the one you played as a child. I’m talking about the hide-and-seek you play as an adult. Adult hide-and-seek is similar to the children’s game, but instead of the guarantee that when you hide someone will seek you out, you hide and wonder if anyone will seek you out. That is, if you care at all. Most of the time it should probably just be called “Hide and hope nobody notices that they haven’t seen or heard from you in a while.”

This hide-and-seek is much less fun and much more depressing than the game we played as kids. The excitement of being found and the laughter, giggling, and screaming “Ha! I found you!” and “Ah! You found me!” is replaced by wondering if anyone even knows you’re hiding or thinks to look for you. When playing hide-and-seek as a child, you often choose a dark, isolated place where nobody else is, where you can’t be easily seen or found. But when you play as an adult it doesn’t matter where you are; being out in the open in the middle of a room full of people can be darker than anywhere you hid as a child.

I think if we are honest with ourselves, our intent as the hider is the same in both games. We want to find a place where it’s hard for someone to find us, but not impossible. What good would it do to find a place where nobody can ever find you? In either game, if we hide in a place where it’s impossible to be found and never give ourselves up or come out of hiding, we will eventually die. Granted, the likelihood of a child hiding that well and being that committed to the game isn’t very high, but as an adult we can absolutely be that committed. This game may not lead to physical death for everyone who plays it, but if we play it long enough and are committed enough, it can easily cause us to die inside and lose who we are. It’s a dark place and the longer we stay there, the darker it gets.

So, when we find ourselves in that dark place, how do we get out of it? I’m not sure I know. I’m probably not the best person to ask because, if I’m honest, I feel a lot of comfort in that hiding spot. I’m not afraid of the dark and I enjoy being by myself, so it feels like a safe place. It’s a place where I don’t have to worry about much or be anything other than alive. But it’s not a place where we can ever truly be alive.

You may not have to worry about whether you are good enough, but you’ll also never know how it feels when someone accepts you for who you are. 

You may not have to worry about whether you will ever be successful, but you’ll also never be able to appreciate the good things in your life.

You may not ever have to worry about whether you are going to let someone down, but you’ll also never know how it feels to lift someone up.

You may not have to worry about being a disappointment, but you’ll also never know what it feels like to bring someone joy.

You may not have to worry about whether anyone will like you for who you are, but you will never really know who you are.

To find our way out of the darkness we must focus on the light. Granted, it may seem like a microscopic dot of light in the distance or a flickering flashlight that needs fresh batteries, but it’s there. The light is always there and even the smallest, faintest hint of light will overcome the darkest darkness. It will still seem dark at first, but when we focus on the light and begin to move toward it, the darkness will begin to fade away. The closer we get to the light, the less we will notice the darkness. Our goal should be to get so close to the source of the light that all the darkness is behind us.

It won’t always be easy. There will be times when we hear those feelings of inadequacy, doubt, fear, and worry shouting out those familiar numbers, trying to drag us back into another game of hide-and-seek.

1…”You’re not good enough!”

2…”You can’t do anything right!”

3…”You’ll never be successful!”

4…”You’re a failure and a disappointment!”

5…”You don’t deserve to be happy!”

Those numbers being shouted at us, they are coming from the darkness, trying to pull us back in to that hiding place. The difference between this game of hide-and-seek and the one we played as kids is that when we were kids, the numbers eventually stopped and the person counting would try to find us. In this game, if we listen to the numbers being shouted out at us, they will never stop and there is no “Ready or not, here I come!” There are an infinite amount of numbers and an infinite amount of lies that will continue to be shouted at us until it is all we hear. Rather than instinctively heading back to our hiding place, we must let it be a signal to refocus on the light. For when the numbers are being shouted out from the darkness, it is the light who calls out to us “Olly olly oxen free!” 

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God Is Going To Use You To Do Great Things

God is going to use you to do great things.

For some, it will mean writing a bestselling book that changes the lives of people all over the world. For some, it will mean writing songs that will be used in churches every Sunday and leading sold-out crowds in inspiring times of worship. For some, it will mean leading a mega-church where you preach to thousands of people each week and see countless people saved in response to your messages.

For some, but not for most.

Since nearly every Christian has at some point been told or has told someone else “God is going to use you to do great things,” why is it that we so often feel discouraged, disappointed, or like our lives are just so…normal? Why do we feel like the ways God uses us are so average and unimpressive? Our typical response is to tell ourselves and others who feel this way that this is just a time of preparation – God is preparing and equipping you so that when the time comes, you will be ready and able to do the great things he has for you to do.

But what if that time never comes? What if you go through your whole life and never feel like you have done anything great for God? What does it say about us that the things we view as great are typically the things that bring fame to our name? The truth is, most of us will never reach thousands of people at a time through a book we write, song we sing, or message we preach. Most of us will never seem anything more than normal, average, and unimpressive, but it’s often in the normal, average, and unimpressive that God is using us to do great things.

Those times you sang Jesus Loves Me to your son or daughter at bedtime – that was God using you to do something great.

The Sunday School class that you taught for a couple of weeks or many years – that was God using you to do something great.

The dinner you made for the family who just lost a loved one – that was God using you to do something great.

The encouraging words you spoke to a co-worker who was having a rough day – that was God using you to do something great.

The example that you set for your kids that caused them to want to follow Jesus – that was God using you to do something great.

That note you wrote to your pastor, thanking him for the time, energy, and passion that he gives week-in and week-out – that was God using you to do something great.

The diapers you changed and babies you rocked – that was God using you to do something great.

The money you gave and prayers you prayed for missionaries around the world – that was God using you to do something great.

The times you forgave people who hurt you – that was God using you to do something great.

The years you spent working jobs you hated in order to provide for your family – that was God using you to do something great.

The mornings you spent opening the door for people and welcoming them to church – that was God using you to do something great.

The hug that you gave someone who was going through a difficult time and wondered if anyone cared – that was God using you to do something great.

The legacy you leave that causes generation after generation of your family to follow Christ – that was God using you to do something great.

The great things are in the little things. The normal, average, and unimpressive things you do that bring glory to God and build others up – that was God using you to do something great.

Science vs. The Bible

Why are we so quick to choose sides when it comes to science and the Bible? It seems like we often assume that science is about trying to disprove the Bible or to prove that God doesn’t exist and that faith has no use for science, but in reality they are both about finding truth.

Science is about discovering physical truth; the Bible is about discovering spiritual truth.

Rather than pitting them against each other, we should view them as complementary:

Science proves you are here.
The Bible tells you why you are here.

5 Hour Energy Faith

“God, please give me faith and help me stay strong.”

How many times have we prayed something similar? When it feels like nothing is going right, you wonder what God’s plan is for your life (or if He has one at all), and life is beating you down – some variation of this prayer seems to be our “go-to” prayer. The problem is, that’s not how faith works. Faith is developed, not given.

Isaiah 7:9 – “Unless your faith is firm, I cannot make you stand firm.”

Did you catch that? God didn’t tell us to ask Him for faith when we are desperate, like some sort of 5 Hour Energy faith boost. He says that unless our faith is firm, He cannot make us stand firm. Our strength in difficult times comes from our faith in God and trusting that He is in control; the deeper and more developed our faith in God is, the more we will be able to endure. We must have faith in God’s promise that He is in control – not that He will give us faith and strength any time we ask.

If we want to have the kind of faith that will help us endure even the most difficult and dark seasons in life, we need to be intentional about developing our faith. You could spend your entire life learning facts about something and why it works and even watch other people experience it, but until you do it yourself, you will only have knowledge, not faith.

It can be inspiring to hear other people tell of how their faith helped them endure difficult seasons or circumstances, but in the end it often leaves us wondering why our faith doesn’t seem as strong as theirs. Faith is developed and strengthened through experience – we will always have more faith in something we are constantly around than something we view from a distance. Faith in God is developed through study, prayer, worship, and a commitment to consistently pursue Him. If you want faith that will see you through the difficult times and inspire others, you have to do the work.

God doesn’t give faith to some people, but not to others like some sort of door prize. He gave everyone the capacity for faith; it’s up to us to grow it. Draw close to God and He will draw close to you. You can’t feel the presence of someone you keep at a distance and you will never feel the embrace of someone that you refuse to let come near you.